Centerstone, Seattle’s historic Black community organization, is now Byrd Barr Place

The Central District’s historic Black community-led organization, Centerstone of Seattle, today unveiled a new name: Byrd Barr Place, in honor of Seattle civil rights advocate, educator and journalist, Roberta Byrd Barr.

“Roberta served her neighbors, the community and the city in pursuit of a more just, equitable world,” said Andrea Caupain Sanderson, CEO of Byrd Barr Place. “Our new name is an opportunity for us to re-root ourselves in our history and deepen our commitment to the values that defined us from our beginnings in the Civil Rights era.”

Byrd Barr was a community leader, educator and journalist, best known for hosting Face to Face on KING-TV from 1965-1970. Face to Face shared stories of the Black community and of economic and social inequities impacting families around Seattle. Outside of her work as a journalist, Byrd Barr led marches demanding desegregation and taught at freedom schools serving Black residents in the city. In 1973, she became the first woman to head a Seattle public high school when she served as principal of Lincoln High School.

“Roberta gave so much to this city, and yet her story had remained quietly tucked away,” said Kevin Dawson, Jr., board president of Byrd Barr Place. “I knew that Roberta’s name was right for us the moment I shared it with my daughter – a young, Black woman growing up in Seattle today – and she was immediately hooked. She wanted to know more about this woman who wasn’t afraid of fighting for truth and justice, even when it was daunting.”

Byrd Barr Place was originally founded in1964 as CAMP – the Central Area Motivation Program – and was one of the first community-led organizations funded by the Economic Opportunity Act. Soon after, CAMP was at the heart of the Seattle Civil Rights Movement and had launched over 25 community service initiatives, including employment and training programs. That commitment to building a more prosperous Seattle where all residents, regardless of race or zip code, have access to basic human needs remains central to Byrd Barr Place’s mission.

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Marc Shor